Willenbring Lab »  Alumni »  Postdoctoral Fellows »  Johanna R. Schaub, Ph.D.
Johanna R. Schaub, Ph.D.

Johanna R. Schaub, Ph.D.

Scientist, Pliant Therapeutics

Contact Information

Open Popup
  • Rice University, Houston, Texas, B.S., Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 2006
  • Stanford University, Stanford, California, Ph.D. Cancer Biology, 2012
  • A. P. Giannini Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship
  • Willenbring Laboratory, Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, San Francisco
  • Institute for Regeneration Medicine
  • Mechanisms of liver cancer
  • Mechanisms of liver regeneration

Johanna Schaub, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral fellow in the Willenbring Lab, a Liver Center postdoctoral trainee, and an A. P. Giannini fellow. Dr. Schaub received her B.S. in Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Rice University where she worked in the laboratory of Dr. James McNew using molecular biology techniques to study the regulation of synaptic-vesicle fusion by the protein complexin. She completed her Ph.D. in Cancer Biology at Stanford University in the laboratory of Dr. Tim Stearns using cell biology techniques to identify the role of Rilp-like proteins in the regulation of signaling at the primary cilium. She then joined the laboratory of Dr. Holger Willenbring at UCSF where she uses mouse models to study mechanisms of liver regeneration and cancer towards the development of innovative therapies for liver disease. In addition to research she mentors and trains new students in the laboratory as well as guest lectures in graduate student classes.

  1. Hepatocyte plasticity underlies de novo bile duct formation in a mouse model of bile duct insufficiency; FASEB Liver Biology: Fundamental Mechanisms and Translational Applications; June 2016. (Oral Presentation)
  2. Hepatocyte plasticity underlies de novo bile duct formation in a mouse model of bile duct paucity; American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases; November 2015. (Presidential Poster of Distinction)
  3. Origin of new hepatocytes in normal and injured liver; FASEB Liver Biology: Fundamental Mechanisms and Translational Applications; July 2014. (Oral Presentation)
  4. A role for the Rab-interacting lysosomal protein family in cilia function; American Society for Cell Biology; December 2011. (Poster)
  5. Rilpl2: Characterization of a Novel Ciliary Protein; Cilia, Signaling, and Human Disease, Keystone Symposia; February 2010. (Poster)
  6. Examination of Complexin Function during SNARE-mediated Fusion In Vitro; American Society for Cell Biology; December 2005. (Poster)

X